Easter: The Story Behind “The Blood Will Never Lose Its Power”

Hi, friends. Here is the final installment of the “Story Behind” series this Easter. The theme was blood, and so far we examined “Power in the Blood” and “Nothing But the Blood,” two older hymns. This song is more recent. [The featured images in this series followed Jesus’ last moves. The first one depicted the last supper, the second one depicted Jesus in the garden of Gethsemane, and this one depicts Judas’ kiss that identified Jesus to authorities in the garden.]

Andraé Crouch

andrae-crouch

Crouch, who lived 1942-2015 in California, was a gospel singer, songwriter, composer, and record producer. He was known as “the father of modern gospel music.” [Recall that Rev. Dorsey, author of “Precious Lord, Take My Hand,” was “the father of black gospel music.”] He conducted choirs for secular songs and gospel songs. Fun fact: he earned a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his work with The Lion King. A choir he established in 1960 recorded “The Blood Will Never Lose Its Power” in 1969. According to Crouch himself, he wrote the song at age 14; he felt shy at a friend’s backyard barbecue, so he went inside and sat down at the piano, praying to God– “if you would give me a song, I will live for you forever.” Other gospel songs he wrote include “Through It All,” “My Tribute (To God Be the Glory),” and “Soon and Very Soon.”

“The Blood Will Never Lose Its Power” Devotional

This segment is repeated four times: “The blood that gives me strength/ from day to day/ it will never lose its power.” Faith in God and openness to the Holy Spirit give us an ironic kind of strength–the strength to show mercy, the strength to be humble, and the strength to love our neighbors. The Spirit can also “soothe [our] doubts” and “calm [our] fears.” Yet God is also strong in a traditional sense. His scope “reaches to the highest mountain” and “flows to the lowest valley.” God’s covenant with humanity through Jesus’ sacrifice “will never lose its power.”

For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life. (John 3:16, NRSV)

Lyrics:

The blood that Jesus shed for me
Way back on Calvary
The blood that gives me strength
From day to day
It will never lose its power
It soothes my doubts and calms my fear
And it dries all my tears
The blood that gives me strength
From day to day
It will never lose its power
It reaches to the highest mountains
It flows to the lowest valley
The blood that gives me strength
From day to day
It will never lose its power
It reaches to the highest mountain
It flows to the lowest valley
The blood that gives me strength
From day to day
It will never lose its power
This recording is fantastic. Love it when the background vocals kick in, too.

[Including this bonus video because he’s just amazing and his testimony made me smile.]

 

Thanks for following this Easter’s “Story Behind” series. Happy Easter to everyone! Don’t forget that there is “power in the blood,” and “the blood will never lose its power.” “Nothing but the blood” can give us salvation. God bless you!

9 comments

    1. I was on the verge of doing that one, but I thought about those lyrics versus “Power in the Blood” and thought the devotionals might be too similar, then this one popped up on a website I was using for hymns. My mom’s an excellent singer, and she’s done this one a couple times at my church. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Beautiful song. I loved that recording!

    I had never thought of the blood of Christ in that way until I read your post. For Catholics, as we believe in transubstantiation, Christ is always with us via his body and blood. The bread becomes his body and the wine becomes his blood and that was his gift to us, to give us strength and to remind us of his sacrifice and also of his love for us. He chose to be always with us so that we never forget that he gave his life for us.

    Happy Easter weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you like this song! Interesting point about viewing communion as literal versus figurative– is the bread and wine transformed into Jesus’ body and blood when blessed for Communion, or do the bread and wine represent the body and blood of Jesus? I would be interested to know the theological reasoning behind the Catholic view on Eucharist. As I’ve grown deeper in my faith in general, I’ve tried to understand the three components of the trinity as united but also separate, and I perceive my attempts to walk the Christian path and constantly live in awareness of my faith as a function of the Holy Spirit in my heart.

      Of course these conversations matter, but at the end of the day, whether Communion is literal or figurative, Jesus is risen! Happy Easter 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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